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20120930
20121008
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)
is target, second is sirius xm, third is clorox, clx. fourth is disney, dis, and last is johnson & johnson, jnj. >> all right. let me go to work. sirius, the classic final station. 26, it can't be beaten. sirius is entertainment. disney -- let's call it radio. that would conflict with disney. that's true entertainment. johnson & johnson, pharma. target one of the best retailers in the world. and clorox -- too much like johnson & johnson. this is tough. we are going to get rid of clorox and bring a little industrial in there. why don't we put in, yes, i don't mind saying it, ge, since it's one of the biggest positions in -- or you can do 3m. which made a really good executive decision today that i liked very much about not overpaying for avery dennison. let's go to sandy in ohio. >> caller: boo-yah to you. calling to see if i am diversified. >> okay. >> caller: my five stocks are emc, procter & gamble, pg, bristol-myers, bmy, conagra, cag and vodafone, vad. >> detected a philadelphia accent among that ohio moniker. >> high-yielding telco from europe. not my favorite but that's okay. bristol
captioning made possible by johnson & j where quality products for the american family have been a tradition for generations >> osgood: good morning. i'm charles osgood and this is sunday morning. sometimes the name of a street says it all. wall street. sunset boulevard. fifth avenue. do which you can add k street in washington d.c., the capital insiders when you mention k street you're talking about the lobbying industry. yes, in its way own it is an industry and it's the subject of our sunday morning cover story to be reported this morning by sheryl at kissson. >> lobbying is a notoriously secretive business yet few industries have more impact on our daily lives. >> the boy scouts have lobbyists. the afl-cio has lobbyists. apple does. everybody has a lobbyist. the influence of business in washington d.c. is the third largest business after government and tourism. >> you can still do a lot of military. >> reporter: a rare look inside the powerful world of k street later on sunday morning. >> osgood: on this weekend before columbus day, we've embarked on a journey to discover col
i didn't think it was real. >> reporter: but it was real. until last week, maliza johnson was doing three years in prison on a drug conviction. then she was suddenly set free. what is it like to be out of prison? >> free now. yay! i can breathe. >> reporter: free, because of the bizarre alleged actions of this woman. former massachusetts chemist, annie dookhan. >> can you tell us what happened? >> reporter: the state of massachusetts is accusing dookhan of tampering with drug evidence that could call into question at least 34,000 cases going back to 2003. 34,000. at the moment, she faces only three charges. however, in boston alone, the d.a. estimates as many as 500 convicted felons could be set free. how big of a mess is this? >> at this point, susan, we don't know. >> reporter: at this lab, now closed by the state, dookhan allegedly mishandled drugs seized by police for evidence at trial. she allegedly estimated the amount of drugs at times by simply looking at them, and certified some drugs as cocaine that are now testing negative. she didn't just write down the wrong thing. pros
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)